DREADLOCKED QUEBEC COMIC PLEADS FOR CALM AFTER BEING TOLD HIS HAIR IS

first_imgAdvertisement Advertisement Zach Poitras, an aspiring Montreal comedian, has been told by a university bar he cannot take part in shows because his dreadlocks are seen as a form of cultural appropriation. (Facebook/Canadian Press) Facebook “To read that I am racist because of my hair — I find that absurd,” Poitras wrote in a Facebook post Thursday evening. Login/Register With:center_img A Montreal comic who was told he could not perform — or even be in the audience — at a comedy show because his hairstyle was considered racist, is pleading for calm from both sides of the debate.Zach Poitras, a white man with dreadlocked hair, received international attention after he was recently told by the Coop les Récoltes, a bar and solidarity co-operative at the Université du Québec à Montréal, that he and his hair were unwelcome at its comedy night.A white person with dreadlocks is form of violence toward people of colour, the organizers decided. Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Twitterlast_img read more

POTMUSIC FEST IN VAUGHAN CANCELLED AS ORGANIZERS BLAME BYLAW

first_imgAdvertisement Journey organizers say the festival signed a contact with the Toronto Region Conservation Authority and the Boyd park, but they were blindsided when a new bylaw was passed on May 14 which allowed Vaughan to regulate smoking of tobacco and cannabis within city boundaries.Murray Milthorpe, chief experience officer of the festival, says organizers were not given advance notice that a bylaw was in the works, despite attempts to work closely with the city over a special events permit.“Sadly, Vaughan city council is on the wrong side of history here,” Milthorpe said in a statement.“Journey intends to send an important message to politicians that cannabis is legal. Education, including how to talk to our children about substance use, should not be politicized for partisan gain. Vaughan’s by-law is all about self-preservation and status quo thinking and is a stigmatizing action that hurts the legal market.”Representatives for the City of Vaughan did not respond to requests for comment.Other music festivals have put a stronger emphasis on cannabis following legalization last year. Plans for a sprawling event that blended cannabis education with a summer music festival have been snuffed out by the City of Vaughan.Organizers of the Journey Cannabis and Music Festival say new bylaws introduced by the city have forced their three-day event at the 990-acre Boyd Conservation Park, north of Toronto, to be cancelled.Journey, originally slated to run from Aug. 23 to 25, was supposed to combine a bring-your-own-cannabis approach with a multi-genre lineup of musicians, though performers had yet to be announced. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment The premises were also set to include a beer village, booths selling cannabis paraphernalia and culture items, and a selection of licensed producers who would discuss trends and products, but not actually sell weed. Electronic music event Ever After in Kitchener, Ont. allowed concertgoers to toke up, while this year’s annual 4/20 celebration at Sunset Beach in Vancouver united a park of cannabis vendors with a performance by hip hop act Cypress Hill..Organizers of the Journey festival say ticketholders will receive full refunds within the next week.They’re also searching for a new venue to host the event next year.By David Friend ~ The Canadian Press Advertisement Advertisement Facebook Login/Register With: Twitterlast_img read more

Election 2011 Youth Panel

first_imgAPTN National NewsThere’s one voice missing from Election 2011: Aboriginal youth. They’re Canada’s fastest-growing population, and they’ve got billions of dollars in campaign promises coming their way. Politicians always talk about what needs to happen–but what do young leaders think?Host Cheryl McKenzie is joined in studio by eight of those young Aboriginal leaders from across Canada to discuss what matters to them in Election 2011.Jump to the 30:00 mark in this video for the start of our panel.last_img read more

Missing Women Inquiry hobbled by high profile withdrawals

first_imgAPTN National NewsThe Missing Women Inquiry continues to draw criticism.A high profile Aboriginal organization withdrew its support for the committee this week, hours after an independent legal counsel representing Aboriginal interests withdrew her involvement.These are just the latest to be added to the long list of other First Nation organizations who have already pulled out of the inquiry.APTN National News reporter Tina House has this story.last_img

Have you seen Braedon Gordon

first_imgAPTN National NewsWinnipeg police investigators are searching for Braedon Lee Gordon, 11.Gordon was last seen on April 30 in Winnipeg’s west-end.Gordon is described as 4’9 and weighing about 80 lbs. He has brown eyes, sports a brush cut with lines shaved into the sides.Anyone with information on Gordon’s whereabouts is asked to contact Winnipeg police.last_img

Supreme Court says Harpers tough on crime laws unconstitutional

first_imgThe Canadian Press OTTAWA – The Supreme Court of Canada has struck down two federal laws from the previous Conservative government’s tough-on-crime agenda, ruling both to be unconstitutional.The decisions mean an end to rules for minimum sentences for specific drug crime convictions and limits on credit for pre-trial detention in certain conditions where bail is denied, giving trial judges more leeway in how they deal with offenders.In both decisions, the top court said Parliament has the right to set laws to maintain public safety, but the rules should not be so overly broad that they capture offenders whose incarceration would benefit neither themselves nor the public.Speaking in Waterloo, Ont., Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said his government is reviewing the laws around mandatory minimum sentences.“There are situations where mandatory minimums are relevant,” Trudeau said.“The Liberal party of the past in government brought in mandatory minimums around serious crimes like murder, but at the same time there is a general sense, reinforced by the Supreme Court decision today, that mandatory minimums brought in by the previous government in a number of cases went too far. This is what we are reflecting on.”In a 6-3 ruling, the high court said a mandatory, one-year minimum sentence for a drug crime when the offender has a similar charge on their record constitutes cruel and unusual punishment, a violation of section 12 of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Only twice before has the court found mandatory minimums to violate that particular section of the Charter.The majority ruled that mandatory minimums in this instance cast too wide a net and catch conduct that can range from a “cold-blooded trafficker of hard drugs for profit” to someone who shares a small amount of marijuana with friends. Chief Justice Beverley McLachlin, writing for the majority, said that in the latter instance “most Canadians would be shocked to find that such a person could be sent to prison for one year.”The case came about after Joseph Ryan Lloyd was convicted in September 2014 of three counts of possessing crack, methamphetamine and heroin for the purpose of trafficking in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside.An addict, Lloyd also had a 2012 trafficking charge.The provincial court ruled that while the appropriate sentence for Lloyd was one year, the mandatory minimum sentence constituted cruel and unusual punishment and violated the charter.Raji Mangat, director of litigation for the West Coast Women’s Legal Education and Action Fund, which intervened in the case, said the Supreme Court’s decision righted a wrong by giving judges more leeway in sentencing.“Those sentencing judges, this is what they do day in and day out,” Mangat said. “They have the expertise to be able to decide what is going to be a fit and appropriate sentence and we think that that discretion should stay with the judges.”The Supreme Court also unanimously agreed to strike down provisions passed in 2009 that prohibited a trial judge from giving more than one-for-one credit for pre-trial detention if a justice of the peace denied bail to the person because of a previous conviction.That’s what happened in the case of HamidrezaSafarzadeh-Markhali, of Pickering, who was arrested in November 2010on drug and weapons charges.He was awarded extra pretrial credit by his trial judge and the Ontario Court of Appeal agreed, noting that three offenders with the same criminal records and given the same sentence could effectively end up serving substantially different amounts of time depending on whether they received bail.Safarzadeh-Markhali has since been deported to Iran.The Supreme Court found the law was overly broad and would capture offenders who, for instance, might have been convicted for failing to appear in court.Safarzadeh-Markhali’s lawyer, Jill Presser, said the decision means thousands of people will serve less time in jail “by a factor of days to even years,” many of whom couldn’t get bail because of their circumstances or a lack of support.Combined, she said, the decisions continue to dismantle the Harper-era, tough-on-crime agenda.“The question for Parliament now is do they want to rebuild the structure on solid constitutional grounds, or simply let it come down?”last_img read more

Desjardins partners with fintech to boost online brokerage capabilities

first_imgTORONTO – Desjardins Group has partnered with fintech Hardbacon to boost the capabilities of its online brokerage as the interest in do-it-yourself investing and lower-fee investment options continues to rise.Desjardins Online Brokerage, a division of Desjardins Securities also known as Disnat, allows self-directed investors to conduct trades and manage their stocks on their platform.The partnership with Hardbacon gives the online brokerage’s clients access to stock and portfolio analysis tools on the fintech’s mobile app, as well as a six-hour online investment course, while new clients get 10 free trades within one year on Disnat.Desjardins Group, the largest co-operative financial group in Canada, is the latest company to rollout enhanced options for self-directed trading at a lower cost.On Wednesday, TD Bank Group announced a deal with fintech Hydrogen Technology Corp. to enhance its TD WebBroker platform for do-it-yourself investors and later launch a robo-adviser platform.Desjardins Online Brokerage’s business development manager Louis D’Anjou said interest in self-directed investing is rapidly growing with trades on their platform up 25 per cent in 2018 compared to last year.He added that the biggest growth for the platform was in the number of clients between the ages of 18 and 30, which is up 200 per cent compared to a year ago. The online brokerage has roughly 105,00 clients currently, he said.One sector driving activity on the platform is the cannabis industry, which has seen a flurry of activity as Canada prepares to legalize marijuana for recreational use next month.“It’s incredible — we have a lot of new clients because of that,” D’Anjou said in an interview.Portfolio analysis software has been around for a few years, but have usually been targeted towards institutional investors, said Julien Brault, chief executive of Hardbacon. Their tools help to “empower regular investors,” he said.Desjardins paid Hardbacon an undisclosed amount to offer the fintech’s services to their clients.Companies in this story: (TSX:TD)last_img read more

Oil discounts grow as CEOs complain of Canadas competitiveness gap

first_imgCALGARY – Discounts on Canadian crude oil widened to multi-year highs on Wednesday as oil and gas executives took turns at a conference pointing out Canada’s competitiveness gap in attracting energy investors.Prices for both Western Canada Select, an oilsands bitumen blend, and Edmonton Sweet crude oil fell relative to New York-traded West Texas Intermediate because of a lack of pipeline capacity, growing production from the oilsands and a reduction in demand due to U.S. refinery maintenance shutdowns, said Tim Pickering, founder of price tracker Auspice Capital in Calgary.“All of those things have culminated into a system that is completely overloaded,” Pickering said.“Anything people can move out, they’re moving out, but we’ve basically just got the perfect storm.”He said the WCS differential grew to as much as US$48 per barrel on Wednesday morning, the highest since at least 2011, and the Edmonton Sweet differential was at US$27.50 per barrel, a multi-year high that’s more than three times its typical size.On the sidelines of the Energy Roundtable conference in Calgary, meanwhile, CEO Kevin Neveu of Precision Drilling Corp. said the differentials are having an immediate chilling effect on companies’ ability to fund drilling budgets in Canada.“It’s proportionate to the cash flow. So if (a drilling customer) expected a netback of $50 Canadian or $55 or $60 and they’re only getting $45 or $50, they’ll adjust back to that outlook quickly, within the quarter,” he said.He said the drilling industry in Canada is headed for activity this year in line with 2017, which was the second-worst year for drilling profitability after a disastrous 2016.In a speech later at the conference, Natural Resources Minister Amarjeet Sohi acknowledged there have been “setbacks” for the Canadian oil and gas sector, notably a court’s overturning of the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion approval. But he also cited the signing of a free trade deal with the U.S. and Mexico and a final investment decision by partners in the $40-billion LNG Canada project as recent positives.He told reporters later when asked about high differentials that he feels “frustrated” that no new oil pipelines have been built to take Alberta resources to markets other than the United States.“The amount of revenue we are losing as a country because we don’t have access to non-U.S. markets is absolutely unacceptable and we need to do better and we are committed to do better,” he said.He defended Ottawa’s decision not to appeal the Trans Mountain decision because that would take longer than bowing to the court’s requirement to refer shipping issues to the National Energy Board and fill in gaps in Indigenous consultation on the pipeline.Earlier, Doug Suttles, CEO of Encana Corp. said government policy is making Canada an uncompetitive place to drill for oil and gas.“Today, every well we drill in British Columbia, we pay over $100,000 in carbon tax just on the diesel used to drill and complete that well,” he said during a speech at the conference.“Those products are largely moving to markets in the United States. In the United States, we don’t pay a dollar of carbon tax.”Calgary-based Encana is focused on two major oil and gas plays in Western Canada and two in the southern United States.Due to corporate tax cuts under U.S. President Donald Trump, Suttles pointed out Encana also pays higher income taxes in Canada than it does in the U.S.“As a Canadian, it’s easy to get really down,” said Ian Dundas, CEO of Enerplus Corp., a Calgary-based company with 90 per cent of its production in North Dakota and little in Canada.“We’ve let the Americans outcompete us and outregulate us and we find ourselves in this position.”He said the solution is to stop making the situation worse — citing Ottawa’s Bill C-69 to reform the NEB and its proposed clean fuel standards as examples of that — and start coming up with ways to help Canadian companies compete with U.S. rivals.He added he hopes next year’s federal election encourages the public to discuss changes to national energy policies.Follow @HealingsSlowly on Twitter.Companies in this story: (TSX:ECA, TSX:PD, TSX:ERF)last_img read more

Board seeks to invalidate 6B worth of Puerto Ricos debt

first_imgSAN JUAN, Puerto Rico — A federal control board that oversees Puerto Rico’s finances is asking a court to invalidate more than $6 billion worth of debt issued by the U.S. territory.The board announced late Monday that the debt includes all general obligation bonds issued in 2012 and 2014 in “clear violation” of debt limits established by Puerto Rico’s Constitution. It also said the debt issued violates balanced budget requirements because the money was used to finance deficit spending.The board’s finding comes after a lengthy investigation that began in September 2017 of all debt issued by Puerto Rico.Economist Jose Caraballo told The Associated Press on Tuesday that the board’s decision is a milestone.It is unclear when a judge would rule on the motion that Caraballo said gives the government bargaining power.The Associated Presslast_img read more

Premier announces childcare savings coming into effect next month

first_imgCOQUITLAM, B.C. — B.C. Premier John Horgan announced today that parents with children enrolled in licensed childcare will start seeing savings of up to $350 a month next month.The child care fee reduction is available to families with children up to kindergarten age, who go to licensed child care and whose providers opt in. To date, providers have applied for fee reductions for more than 18,000 children, and more providers are opting in to savings for families every day. The fee reduction will result in savings of:$350 per month for each child in group infant and toddler care.$200 per month for each child in family infant and toddler care.$100 per month for each child in group care for children aged three years to kindergarten.$60 per month for each child in family care for children aged three years to kindergarten.“Parents in every corner of B.C. will start seeing their child care bills go down next month,” said Premier Horgan. “These fee reductions will offer families relief, and help people, particularly women, return to work. No one should be forced to choose between child care and other family needs.” In order to maximize the number of families receiving benefits next month, the government has extended the deadline for child care providers to opt in to April’s fee reduction until April 20th. After that date, providers can sign up for savings for future months at any time.However, not all childcare providers will be able to drop their fees starting next week. Adam Reaburn, owner of the Wiggle and Giggles Daycare in Fort St. John as well as Energeticcity.ca and 100.1 Moose FM, said that fees at his daycare will not be reduced April 1st. Reaburn explained that his Daycare has applied for the Childcare Fee Reduction Program, but the B.C. Government has not confirmed if the daycare has been approved to participate. He added and he doesn’t expect to hear anything before Easter, but that if Wiggles and Giggles is approved, the fee reduction would be applied to future bills.“Parents have been left to struggle with rising child care costs for too long,” said Minister of Children and Family Development Katrine Conroy. “The child care fee reduction is the first step toward bringing down sky-high child care costs so that families can get ahead.”The child care fee reduction will help providers to keep their program competitive with other programs in their community. Those who choose to participate will receive an increase of 10 percent on top of their individual base funding to support operational expenses.last_img read more

Annual Safe Stop event educates people on School Bus Safety

first_img“The lights mean exactly the same thing as the traffic lights”, says Cindy Dettling, Safe Stop Coordinator. “If you approach an intersection and the lights turn amber, you slow down and prepare to stop, the rules for the bus lights are the same”.Safe Stop is inviting residents to stop by to look at the school buses and talk to the drivers.Dettling shares, there is a draw for a chance to win prizes which include concert tickets and gift cards.A big thank you to Moose FM, Canada Safeway, First Truck, Holiday Inn & Suites and the Encana Events Centre, for making Safe Stop a great experience. FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – In celebration of Safe Stop Day residents are welcomed to come to participate at the Safe Stop event at the Canada Safeway parking lot.On Wednesday, September 25th, from 11:00 am to 1:30 pm School 60 PAC will be hosting a BBQ with burgers and beverages by donation with all funds going back to the PAC.Safe Stop is a day dedicated to educating and reminding drivers to keep students safe by slowing down for the flashing amber lights and stopping for the flashing red lights on the back of yellow school buses.last_img read more

CID recovers huge cache of explosives in Bankura

first_imgKolkata: The state Criminal Investigation Department (CID) has seized a huge quantity of explosive materials from Saltora in Bankura. However, CID sleuths were unable to secure any arrest as the accused persons had fled the scene just before police arrived.According to CID sources, sleuths got a tip on Wednesday that a huge quantity of explosive materials was being stored somewhere in Saltora. Working on the information, sleuths came to know about a village called Kastora in Saltora in the evening. Also Read – Centuries-old Durga Pujas continue to be hit among revellersImmediately, a CID team assisted by local police raided the village. During the search operation a warehouse was found, which was filled with sacks and cartons. After opening the cartons, sleuths were stunned to see the explosive materials. The CID team also spotted an abandoned SUV and a bike near the warehouse. During the ensuing search and seizure procedure, a huge consignment of explosives was recovered. During documentation, CID personnel found 52,500 pieces of electric detonators, 106 cartons of gelatin sticks (power gel) and 133 sacks of ammonium nitrate. The abandoned SUV and bike were also seized. Sleuths are trying to identify the owners of the vehicles. During investigation sleuths came to know that the explosive materials were being procured from Orissa, Telangana and Jharkhand. It is suspected that the explosive materials might have been procured for use in illegal stone quarries. However, all aspects are being checked to ascertain whether any anti-national movement was being organised in the area.last_img read more

Defective statehood vexed PRC

first_imgArunachal Pradesh, the land of the rising sun in India, goes to polls for both the 60 assembly seats and the 2 Lok Sabha seats on April 11, the first day of the long-drawn ensuing general elections in India. And beyond right concerns about the fast deteriorating road and bridge infrastructure, poor public health, education and supplies, etc., the dominant issues impacting public opinion in this round seems to be the protest against what many say as “defective statehood which needs amendment, and permanent residence certificate (PRC) to outsiders which need to be quashed.” Also Read – A special kind of bondThe People’s Party of Arunachal (PPA), which has been demanding for a constitutional amendment of the Arunachal Statehood Act of 1986, has appealed to the people of the state to consider the task of correcting and amending the ‘defective’ Act as their prime agenda. They want the Act amended, which will give Arunachal a status at par with Nagaland and Mizoram. And this is catching up with others joining the fray, including Janata Dal Secular led by Jarjum Ette, a parliamentary candidate from West Arunachal, and other leaders of National People’s Party, etc. Also Read – Insider threat managementIt may be recalled that the former parliamentarians from the state, PK Thungon and Wangpa Lowang had tried their best to amend the defects in the Arunachal Statehood Bill when the bill was being tabled in Parliament in 1986. “The governor has been equipped with more powers to deal with law and order in whatever manner he thinks fit. The people have been denied the constitutional right of defence in respect of land, culture and social and religious practices…Therefore, it is much more appropriate that the people should be protected more than to equip the governor with more powers,” PK Thungon was quoted as pleading in the Parliament. Emphasising the need to bring an end to the dependency syndrome, secretary general of PPA, Kaling Jerang noted recently that the necessary constitutional amendment of the Act can give Arunachalis back their “lost pride and self-respect”. Many political and intellectual voices, including that of woman activist Jarjum Ette (JDS) believes that Arunachal, in spite being one of the most resourceful states in the country, has been reduced to the status of dependency, and to such an extent that often, with the change of the government in the Centre, the entire state cabinet changes political colours, as was seen recently in the case of Congress ministers and MLAs (except the then CM Nabam Tuki) becoming a BJP cabinet overnight. This dependency syndrome has to be done away with by amending the ‘defective’ Statehood Act, which will give the people back their ownership rights in every sense-culture, customary and traditional tribal rights over their land, forests, rivers and untapped mineral resources. Even Gegong Apang, the longest-serving chief minister of the state who joined BJP in 2014 ahead of the Lok Sabha polls, had submitted a letter to Modi on this matter. He said all central leaders during their visit to the state had been approached but the Centre did not budge. Even the state Assembly passed a resolution in this regard twice in 1994 and in 2013. Apang, who was the first chief minister of the state, claimed he and other state leaders were not consulted on the Arunachal Pradesh Statehood Act of 1986. The then Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi had assured Arunachal leaders that the Constitution would be amended for rectification of the act but nothing has been done so far. The Act under Schedule VI of the Constitution of India has made Arunachalees merely land protectors as the central government owns the minerals below the surface of state soil. Hence, activists today believe that its amendment to bring the state under Schedule six of the Constitution of India alone would protect the traditional rights and liberty of indigenous patriotic people of this sensitive North-eastern border state of India. Arunachal gets limited royalty from the central government for any minerals extracted because of Delhi’s apathy, unlike Nagaland, Meghalaya and Mizoram which own their mineral resources being under Schedule V. If the records of former Oil India CMD Chudamani Ratnam are any indication that carbon deposits are trapped in coal cells (over 25,000 million tons of carbon deposits, including 1400 million tons in of which Arunachal) in Arunachal and part of Assam, then if tapped could meet country’s requirements for next 100 years, which was admitted by the then Union Petroleum Minister Mani Shankar Aiyar here in 2005. The state coffer would enrich if these deposits are exploited to make Arunachal one of the richest states of India. At the core of the concerns on statehood, there are two aspects. One is revenue for the state from its resources and limiting gubernatorial powers. Second, there is also the concern of identity. Experts feel an urgent need to strengthen and codify tribal customs and traditions for the future generations not to face identity crisis under the impact of modernisation. Tribal communities in various other parts of India, as in Chattisgarh or Odisha, are facing various cultural onslaughts in their lives apart from battling for their rights of jal, jangal and jameen (water, forest produce and land). It must be noted here that the Arunachal state assembly had unanimously passed a resolution directing the state government to move the Centre for a constitutional amendment with provision for special protection for the state. The assembly had also resolved to urge the Centre to expeditiously amend Article 371H of the Constitution to bring Arunachal Pradesh at par with the provisions of Article 371A(1) with a view to provide special constitutional protection to the people of the state in respect of religious and social practices, customary laws and rights of ownership and transfer of land and its resources. However, recently, the Arunachal Pradesh Land Management Minister Nabam Rebia of BJP told the assembly that the Arunachal Pradesh Statehood Act, 1986, being a central act, its amendment is not under the purview of the state government. To conclude, whether Congress or BJP, both central governments have done a lip service without ever actually bringing this bill on the floor of Parliament in the last 30 years for any amendment. The other vexed issue is that of the PRC. Protests broke out in Arunachal capital Itanagar on February 21-23, after a State government-appointed committee recommended PRC for six non-Arunachal Pradesh Scheduled Tribe residents of Namsai and Changlang districts. Three people were killed in the clashes. Giving in to public pressure, Arunachal Pradesh government froze its decision on the controversial permanent residence certificate (PRC) that triggered widespread violence for three days, leading to the torching of the Deputy Chief Minister’s house. Confirming that three people died in the violence, which saw widespread arson and the torching of the residence of Deputy Chief Minister Chowna Mein, central MOS Home, Kiren Rijiju, also sitting MP of Western Arunachal, had faulted his party’s state government for not being able to communicate the situation to the citizens. Though BJP state president Tapir Gao, himself a Parliamentary candidate from East Arunachal, believes that the issue will not have any impact on the poll prospects of the party but on ground there is widespread resentment and social media noise on this aborted attempt for PRC and the shelved Citizenship Amendment Bill (CAB) which calls for citizenship to immigrants by religion and was withdrawn in Rajya Sabha recently after massive protests in the North East. Such optimism is, however, not shared by former BJP state general secretary Jarpum Gamlin, who is an assembly candidate this time. With these two major talking-points, Arunachal Pradesh assembly and Lok Sabha polls this year may throw some surprises and the state may actually veer towards a multi-party state polity rather than be confined within the binary of Congress-BJP so far. (The author is a media academic and has a spent a considerable number of years in Arunachal Pradesh. Views are personal)last_img read more

It was instinctive dont know from where game spirit comes

first_imgJaipur: Unapologetic about ‘Mankading’ Jos Buttler in an IPL match here, senior Indian off-spinner Ravichandran Ashwin said his decision was “instinctive” and cricket laws should be reconsidered if what he did was against the ‘spirit of the game’. Kings Xi Punjab captain Ashwin, in a match against Rajasthan Royals on Monday, ‘Mankaded’ rival batsman Jos Buttler, triggering a debate on ‘spirit of the game’. In a first in 12 editions of the IPL, Ashwin ran out a rampaging Buttler, who was at the non-strikers’ end, on his delivery stride in the 13th over, an action popularly known as ‘Mankading’. TV replays showed that Ashwin had waited for Buttler to move out of the crease before removing the bails. Also Read – Puducherry on top after 8-wkt win over Chandigarh”Look it was very instinctive. It wasn’t planned or anything like that. It’s there within the rules of the game. I don’t know from where the understanding of the Spirit of the Game comes,” Ashwin said at the post-match press conference. The mode of dismissal is permissible as per ICC Rule 41.16 of playing conditions, according to which there is no need to warn the batsman as was the case in earlier times. “Naturally if it’s there in the rules, it’s there. Probably, we need to go back to the rules,” India’s premier Test spinner said. Also Read – Vijender’s next fight on Nov 22, opponent to be announced laterWhen reminded of a past incident when former West Indian skipper Courtney Walsh let off Pakistan’s Saleem Jaffer in crucial 1987 World Cup match at Lahore in a similar situation, Ashwin retorted sharply. “Neither was Jos Buttler playing then nor was I playing. So it is very very pertinent to just not compare two people,” he said. When probed further on whether it affects the ‘spirit of the game’, the irritation was palpable on his face. “I don’t understand the point because it’s rules. What applies for one man doesn’t apply for everyone else?” he asked. There has been a debate whether Ashwin deliberately delayed while loading up on his delivery stride having apprehended that Buttler backs up too far. “I didn’t even load and he left the crease. It’s always been my take on the crease, because it’s my half of the crease,” he said. The Kings XI skipper lauded his bowlers for bringing the team back into the contest. “We all know that after six overs it is going to slow down. Credit to bowlers on how they bowled. I have been working on a lot of variations, pretty happy that it came out,” he said. “Sam (Curran) had a bad day with the ball, but he came back well. Everybody ticked their boxes. We do have a few options amongst us, but if we can have good five overs, there is nothing like it.” Moving away from the controversy, Ashwin said the over from Sam Curran was the turning point of the match. “The over from Sam Curran and then of Mujeeb Ur Rehman was the turning point, we grabbed two-two wickets in them. The asking rate comes down to below 10 and as far as I remember, the Royals needed 37-38 runs from four overs. The game was very much in their hands but the four quick wickets brought us back into the game,” said Ashwin. “The surface got better when they were batting. The ball was holding on when we had batted,” he added. Man-of-the-match Chris Gayle, who hit 79 off 47 balls, said he was happy with his form. “This is a big ground to be honest. I have been in a good form, so it was good to start on a winning note. Sarfaraz (Khan) got some runs today, which was really good. “One thing we discussed before the tournament was to win this IPL for the Universe Boss (referring to himself) and the youngsters have got my backing,” he signed off.last_img read more

Reaching for smartphone bad for health

first_imgUsing your smartphone to relax and pass time may be associated with negative feelings, lack of control and a reduced sense of purpose in life, a study warns. The study, published in the journal Computers in Human Behavior, is the first to thoroughly evaluate how smartphone use is associated with measures of subjective and psychological wellbeing. Researchers at Deakin University in Australia showed habitual smartphone use and entertainment use – to relax, escape and pass time – were the best predictors of lower wellbeing. Also Read – An income drop can harm brainThe survey of over 500 students found problematic smartphone use was associated with feelings of negative emotions, lack of control, a reduced sense of purpose in life, and a ability to resist social pressure. “There’s a constant stream of news and entertainment in our life now, and if that content is not necessarily positive it might be contributing to technological overload or techno-exhaustion,” said lead researcher Sharon Horwood from Deakin’s School of Psychology. Also Read – Shallu Jindal honoured with Mahatma Award”While there has been some analysis of smartphone use and subjective wellbeing, this study goes into much greater depth,” Horwood said in a statement. Past research has examined wellbeing in terms of life satisfaction and whether people tend to experience more positive emotions than negative emotions. “This research offers a more complete picture of what makes the ‘good life’ including positive social relationships, a sense of personal growth, autonomy, and having a sense of control over one’s life,” Horwood said. “While we found that smartphone use is unrelated to people’s overall life satisfaction, it is associated with mood and these broader indicators of human flourishing,” she said. “Wellbeing is about feeling satisfied with your life, managing day-to-day activities, and positive relationships. We found that problematic smartphone use impacts all those things,” he said. Horwood said there are four main areas of wellbeing which negatively related to problematic smartphone use. These included how much control people felt they had over their use, whether smartphone use interferes with a person’s day-to-day life, whether the phone gets in the way of positive relationships with others, and whether smart phone use was a panacea for boredom and lack of personal growth. “The question is, does using your smartphone in a problematic way lower wellbeing, or is someone whose wellbeing is low for other reasons more likely to turn to their smartphone for comfort, distraction, or perhaps escapism?” she said. However, Horwood said it was important to note her study showed smartphone use was not all bad. “For what we term ‘communication use’ – calls and text messages – we found a slight positive association with wellbeing,” she said. The next step in research is to drill down into the impact of smartphone use on children’s social and emotional wellbeing.last_img read more