Bahamas govt to assist cultural NGOs with registration

first_img Unified effort to help Fire Victims Related Items:michael pintard, ministry of youth, NGO, Sport & Culture Bahamas Senator gets help for Crooked Island Government Camps start July 1 Recommended for you Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppGrand Bahama, Bahamas July 20, 2017 — The Minister of Youth, Sport & Culture Micheal Pintard has said that the Government will pay half of the registration fees for NGOs focused on cultural work.Pintard made the statements at a meeting of cultural leaders at the Bishop Michael Eldon School on Saturday. Those present at the meeting included artisans, dance and drama performers and Junkanoo leaders. Pintard said that the creative industries is the fastest-growing sector in most countries and The Bahamas was behind in this industry. He said: “Those are the areas that are rapidly growing, multi, trillion dollar industries around the world. The Bahamas is one of those developing countries that have not yet gotten the memo. So, we have to change that.”He encouraged cultural practitioners to legally register their organizations and pledged government’s assistance with this process. “Half-way for us means that we are prepared to bring in house two attorneys who will sit in a room with those of you who have paper work completed to assist you in getting incorporated,” he added.Saying that it is important to monetize certain aspects of culture and talent, Pintard also told attendees that registration would open doors to them for international funding. “This will dramatically drive your cost down. Our goal is to make sure that all of you are properly registered, which will open up the doors for you to go out there and apply for funding for your product or your organization. Being registered will allow you to seek funding from overseas as well.” Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApplast_img read more

JAMAICA Heart Foundation concerned about marketing unhealthy food to children

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp#Jamaica, January 30, 2018 – Kingston – The Heart Foundation of Jamaica (HFJ) is expressing concern about the marketing of unhealthy products to children in Jamaica as the country grapples with a high level of childhood obesity.  Speaking at a JIS Think Tank on Wednesday (January 24) to mark Heart Month, Executive Director of the HFJ, Deborah Chen, explained that children are being targeted in advertising campaigns that are geared towards the purchase of food with little or no nutritional value.“If you pay attention to prime time television and other media, you would see that there are many ads targeting our young children.  The sugary, sweetened beverage is of particular concern, bearing in mind that added sugars have no nutritional benefit, so you may be getting the calories but not getting anything nutritious from them,” she explained.  Mrs. Chen pointed out that the obesity situation in Jamaica, which she said is largely due to unhealthy nutrition, is of particular concern as it is a major risk factor for non-communicable diseases (NCDs).She added that the rate of childhood obesity in Jamaica has increased, and it is now at a high of 30 per cent.  The Executive Director commended the steps being taken by the Government to address childhood obesity.  She said that HFJ welcomes the collaboration between the Ministries of Health and Education on the School Nutrition Policy.“It will address what is being sold in schools and on the school campuses, and that should involve talking to parents and involving the whole family.  I’m sure some education will take place around that policy, as it is currently being worked on and to be implemented by the start of the next school year,” she pointed out.“We don’t wish to see our children of younger and younger ages having diabetes.  We don’t want to see diseases that are normally middle- and old-age diseases starting to get to younger people,” she added.  HFJ joins the rest of the world in observing Heart Month during February of each year, and the theme for 2018 is ‘Healthy Nutrition: Know Your Labels’.Release: JIS Related Items:last_img read more

Subpicosecond photonefficient imaging using singlephoton sensors

first_img Active imaging has broad applications across disciplines that range from autonomous driving to microscopic imaging of biological samples. Key requirements for these applications include high accuracy with timing, fast acquisition rates, dynamic operating ranges and high detection sensitivity to image objects hidden from a camera’s view. Remote sensing and automated applications demand acquisition ranges from <1 meter to the kilometer scale. Non-line-of-sight imaging relies on obtaining encoded information via the few returning photons of multiply scattered indirect light, in addition to the directly reflected light. To enable these applications, ultra-sensitive detectors were developed to record individual photons returning from a pulsed source of illumination. Single -photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) are one of the most sensitive time-resolved detector technologies that can be produced using the complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) manufacturing process. The SPADs were rapidly established as a core detector technology for 3D imaging.In its principle-of-function, SPADs are reverse-biased photodiodes that operate in Geiger mode, i.e. above their breakdown voltage. When photons are incident on the active surface of a SPAD, a time stamped electron avalanche can be triggered. Repeated time stamping of photons returning from a synchronously pulsed illumination source that typically operate at MHz rates can accumulate a histogram of photon counts in time. The resulting histogram documents the approximate intensity of the returning light pulse to recover and characterize the distance, reflectance and 3D geometry of an object hidden from view. The performance of the proposed method was assessed on two scenes with highly varying reflectance and depth profiles, which included the Statue of David and a Bas-relief scene. Both instances contained objects with complex geometries and varying reflectance properties including specular behavior for the "Statue of David" and Lambertian reflectance with spatially varying albedo in the 'Bas-relief" scene. For both scenes the scientists captured a ground truth reference measurement (information provided by empirical evidence) with a 5% neutral density filter, which eliminated pileup distortions by damping the source intensity. The hardware of the system contained a time-resolved sensor, pulsed laser, illumination and collection optics. The setup also had a set of scanning mirrors to achieve a raster scan illumination pattern. The timing of photon arrivals was captured with a PicoHarp 300 time-correlated single photon counting module. The illumination source was a 450 nm or 670 nm picosecond laser (generating full width at half maximum FWHM, pulse widths of 90 ps and 50 ps). The collection optics consisted of a 75 m objective lens, 30 mm relay lens and a microscope objective, designed to extend the field of view of the SPAD across the area scanned by the source of illumination. The experimental measurements served as input for the proposed method and were acquired without any filters in the optical path. Depth and albedo reconstructions along with corresponding error maps were obtained during the study. The results verified that the proposed method achieved high-quality reconstructions unaffected by scene-dependent pileup or shot noise (electronic noise associated with the particle nature of light). The results were compared to conventional methods, such as the log-matched filter-estimate and Coates' pileup correction method that did not as effectively suppress pileup and suffered from scene-dependent depth precision. In contrast, the method introduced by Heide et al. achieved sub-picosecond accuracy. Experimental hardware for 3D imaging. The schematic illustration shows the ‘Statue of David’ scene, source of illumination and the procedure of time-stamping for image reconstruction. Credit: Scientific Reports, Doi: 10.1038/s41598-018-35212-x Experimental reconstructions. A recorded spatio-temporal distribution of photon counts. (a,e) is processed to estimate a 3D point cloud (b,c,f,g) that contains both depth and albedo information, here shown for two different scenes (photographs shown in (d,h)). The color-coded errors maps (d,h) directly compare the results of several depth estimation techniques, including log-matched filtering, Coates’ method followed by Gaussian fit (on high-flux measurement), and the proposed method. Credit: Scientific Reports, Doi: 10.1038/s41598-018-35212-x Explore further Citation: Sub-picosecond photon-efficient imaging using single-photon sensors (2018, December 17) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-12-sub-picosecond-photon-efficient-imaging-single-photon-sensors.html Sub-picosecond 3D Imaging Framework. (a) A collimated, pulsed laser illuminates the scene at a single point. The laser is laterally scanned using a 2-axis mirror galvanometer. Timing and control electronics time-stamp each detected photon arrival relative to the last emitted pulse and accumulate these events in a histogram of spatio-temporal photon counts (b). This histogram is processed to estimate both reflectivity and depth information (c). Two points are highlighted, one corresponding to high-flux (d) and the other to low-flux (e) measurements. Whereas the latter are noisy, high-flux measurements suffer from pileup distortion which introduce a significant bias for the depth estimation of conventional algorithms. The proposed estimation method accurately models both of these scenarios, allowing for reflectance information and travel time to be estimated with sub-picosecond accuracy from severely distorted measurements. Credit: Scientific Reports, Doi: 10.1038/s41598-018-35212-x Optimal photon count regime. Depth reconstruction accuracy for varying photon counts for the 450 nm Alphalas LD-450-50 laser (FWHM of 90 ps). The conventional log-matched filter, Coates’ method, and the proposed method are compared. The optimal number of photon counts lay around the unconventional region of 1 photon detected per pulse on average, independent of the impulse response and for a broad range of histogram bin widths. Credit: Scientific Reports, Doi: 10.1038/s41598-018-35212-x © 2018 Science X Network Depending on the expected application, SPADs can operate in free running mode (that allows all photon events to be simultaneously detected at all arrival times) or gated mode (where only photons in a specific time window between pulses are detected). All applications are subject to a fundamental phenomenon known as pileup distortion that severely limits accuracy. Pileup can inherently limit the working principle of the SPAD detector. For example, after each triggered electron avalanche, the detector requires quenching prior to detecting further photon arrival events. During this 'dead time' (ten to hundreds of nanoseconds), the detector is inactive. This may result in the earlier photons of a single laser pulse triggering an avalanche, while later pulses are likely ignored in the dead time; creating inaccurate skewed measurements known as pileup. The phenomenon can be avoided by operating active imaging systems in a low-flux regime, as seen with state-of-the-art techniques used for first-photon imaging before. However, conditions vary for 3D imaging applications in robotics, biological imaging or automotive sensing as they operate in environments where objects reflecting both high and low numbers of photons are essential for decision making. The large variance in acquired photon counts that results from diverse depths or the varying reflectivity of different objects is crucial for 3D imaging. In this work, Heide et al. introduced a new algorithm of estimation that overcame existing limitations of active 3D imaging systems using free running SPADs. The proposed method improved the accuracy of the existing depth and albedo estimation, across a wide range from low-flux to high-flux measurements. The scientists introduced a probabilistic image formation model that included pileup, with efficient inverse methods derived for depth and albedo estimations. The reconstruction framework jointly estimated all unknown parameters to overcome algorithmic limitations that previously restricted the timing precision. The proposed method allowed highly accurate and fast 3D imaging to open new operating regimes of photon-efficient 3D imaging applicable in conditions with dramatically varying photon counts. center_img The code and data used by Heide et al. to generate the findings of the study will be available on GitHub. In total, the proposed probabilistic image formation model and corresponding inverse methods attained sub-picosecond accuracy for active 3D imaging, despite the laser pulse widths being larger than 50 ps. The novel method achieved high precision across a dynamic range from low-flux to high-flux measurements compared to traditional techniques. In the future, the proposed method can facilitate long-range acquisition by multiplexing multiple pileup affected responses. The proposed innovation paves the way for fast and precise photon-efficient 3D imaging systems, where widely varying photon counts are observed in practice. Applications can range across broad disciplines to include 3D mapping and navigation, art reconstruction and conservation, autonomous driving, vision for robots and machines, geographic information, industrial and microscopic imaging. Single-photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) are promising detector technologies that may be used to achieve active 3D imaging systems with fast acquisition, high timing accuracy and high detection sensitivity. Such systems have broad applications in the domains of biological imaging, remote sensing and robotics. However, the detectors face technical impairments known as pileup that cause measurement distortions to limit their precision. In a recent study, conducted at the Stanford University Department of Electrical Engineering, scientists Felix Heide and co-workers developed a probabilistic image formation model that could accurately model pileup. Using the proposed model, the scientists devised inverse methods to efficiently and robustly estimate the scene depth and reflectance from recorded photon counts. With the algorithm, they were able to demonstrate improvements to the accuracy of timing, compared to existing techniques. More importantly, the model allowed accuracy at the sub-picosecond in photon-efficient 3D imaging for the first time in practical scenarios, whereas previously only widely-varying photon counts were observed. The results are now published in Scientific Reports. Journal information: Scientific Reports More information: 1. Sub-picosecond photon-efficient 3D imaging using single-photon sensors doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-35212-x , Felix Heide et al, 07 December 2018, Scientific Reports.2. Mapping the world in 3D www.nature.com/articles/nphoton.2010.148 , Brent Schwarz, July 2010, Nature Photonics.3. The correction for photon ‘pile-up’ in the measurement of radiative lifetimes iopscience.iop.org/article/10. … 22-3735/1/8/437/meta, P B Coates, February 1968, Journal of Physics E: Scientific Instruments, IOP Science.4. Photon-Efficient Computational 3-D and Reflectivity Imaging with Single-Photon Detectors ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/7150537 , S. Dongeek et al, July 2015, IEEE Transactions on Computational Imaging. Researchers generate 3D images using just one photon per pixel (w/ video) , Nature Photonics , Science This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Spice up your Sunday Brunch

first_imgHow would anyone think of a Sunday, overlooking a lazy morning and some exciting food? The foodie leaps up within us with high hopes of exotic delicacies as Sundays approach, yet neither of us really feel like taking the responsibility of cooking them. Café Knosh at The Leela Ambience Convention Hotel hosts an array of mouth watering items at brunch for you to indulge in. The all-day-dining restaurant has some of the best gourmet offerings from across the continents.  Also Read – Add new books to your shelfWith a variety of choices, this café will cast a spell on you, and make you come back for brunch over and again. There is more than enough room for your whole family to enjoy in the warm and comfortable ambience at the restaurant. With several classy salads and various  kinds of soup and starters, you may start your meal carefully keeping in mind not to stuff your tummy with them! There are several more dishes in the menu which you need to try out before satiating your stomach. The extensive buffet has Indian, Chinese, Middle-eastern and Western cuisine available for lunch and dinner. It also features a live pizza oven for the beloved Italian delicacies. Their chicken pumpkin soup is a masterpiece – one would never have wondered how good pumpkin and chicken might taste together in a soup. Those with their hands up for Western dishes will be in awe tasting the baked mushrooms, fried chicken and grilled fish. The soft and creamy mushrooms are a delightful bite, whereas the crispy chicken adds on to the much-needed crunch in a meal. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveThe thin crust chicken pizza, which comes out fresh from that live oven, is something that you must not miss on your visit to Café Knosh, or you would lose out on heaven! If your palate is more inclined to Indian cuisine you would be on cloud nine to find the variety of vegetarian and non-vegetarian curry based delicacies, varied type of roti and rice. You might not want to gorge on the food with a dry mouth (enter the exquisite drinks!). In case you are fond of mocktails, definitely try the watermelon juice based mocktail or the Virgin Mojito for a refreshing feel. Cosmopolitan – a vodka-based cocktail will uplift your mood with its perfect taste. Moving on to the sweet endings, dessert lovers will go gaga over the exhaustive display of desserts. The mango vanilla mousse melting in your mouth will take you back to fond summer memories with the juicy mango pulp tingling your taste buds. If you are fond of creme brulee and want to try one here, you might not be very overwhelmed, but the tarts will instantly win your heart.last_img read more