Police officers who delayed attending a 999 call to go to McDonalds

first_imgThe delay in attending was not justified, you should have proceeded to the address straight awayAkbar Khan, Chairman The officers did not attend the call immediately (stock image)Credit:Alamy  Chairman Akbar Khan said: “This matter arises from an incident that took place on the 15 April 2015 when PC Bateman, the driver and PC Stephenson was the operator.”The allegations are admitted by both, they accepted a breach of standard of professional behaviour.”However they state that the behaviour amounted to only misconduct and then gross misconduct.”The late attendance should not be conflated with the sad death of Miss Begum.”Turning therefore to the facts, by accepting the CAD (computer aided dispatch) you indicated that you were en route to Miss Begum’s address.”You were not acting in accordance with the user manual because you were not actually en route.”The delay in attending was not justified, you should have proceeded to the address straight away.” As the panel delivered it’s ruling PC Bateman’s dad, who sat at the back of the room, gave a sigh of relief.The chairman said: “It was accepted that the IPCC concluded that the call should have been graded an ‘I’ grade from the outset, however no weight should be placed on this.”An ‘S’ grade requires a police officer at the scene within 0-60 minutes, but this does not mean you have 60 minutes to get there, this is the maximum you should take.”Both officers accepted poor judgement in decision to have tea on the go instead of going straight to the address and this poor decision making was no more than an honest mistake, the panel accepts these submissions.”On the balance of probabilities that officers have breached the standards as alleged by the appropriate authority.”In all of the circumstances the breach of standards of professional behaviour in relation to police officers amounts to misconduct only and not gross misconduct.”  Police car Two police officers who delayed attending a 999 call about a suicide to get refreshments from McDonald’s are likely to keep their jobs, a disciplinary hearing has ruled. PCs Gavin Bateman and Tony Stephenson, of the Metropolitan Police,  spent half-an-hour drinking tea and filling out paperwork before attending the home of a 22-year-old woman who had sent a suicidal message to a friend. But Fahima Begum was found dead when the officers arrived at her home, almost 40 minutes after a friend had called 999 and asked for an ambulance.  On Monday the disciplinary hearing accepted that the officer’s actions were an “honest mistake” and concluded that they had committed misconduct, but not gross misconduct meaning they will likely stay in the force.  Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

Roses could smell sweeter and last for longer after scientists crack genetic

A team from the University of Lyon identified the enzyme that helps produce roses’ intoxicating aroma three years ago.They said the key lay in encouraging the roses to produce greater levels of an organic compound called geraniol, which is produced in petals.Arthur Bouquet, an American horticulturalist, claimed that just 50 per cent of today’s roses have a noticeable scent, compared with 75 per cent in the 19th century. David Austin Roses Vanessa Bell “I hope we will be able to change how these flowers look in the future and make them last longer with more of a scent, which is lost the longer roses stay in a vase.“They could also be made more brightly-coloured.”The research, published in the journal Nature Genetics, is expected to help researchers and breeders to manipulate rose flowering and colour, strengthen scent, or increase vase life.Writing in the journal, the scientists said: “Reconstructing regulatory and secondary metabolism pathways allowed us to propose a model of interconnected regulation of scent and flower colour.”This genome provides a foundation for understanding the mechanisms governing rose traits and should accelerate improvement in roses.” A rose on display at the 2016 Hampton Court Flower show The scientists, led by Mohammed Bendahmane, from the University of Lyon in France, made comparisons with the genomes of other plants including strawberry, apricot and peach, to explore rose ancestry and evolution.They uncovered more than 36,000 protein-coding genes, and a biochemical pathway that co-ordinated the regulation of scent and colour.A number of candidate genes for flowering were identified which could in future be targeted to produce genetically improved rose cultivars.“If you go to the market and look at the cut roses, they won’t smell like anything. They smell like plastic,” Dr Bendahmane told The Times. A rose by any other name would smell as sweet, so William Shakespeare’s Juliet famously declared.But a rose that has been genetically improved would smell even sweeter according to scientists who have cracked the DNA code of Britain’s favourite flower.Experts have created the first complete map of the popular flower, which they believe could help restore the heady scene that has dulled in recent years.Researchers said that by developing the blueprint – the first high-quality genome of the flower- they could engineer roses to be more fragrant, more colourful and longer lasting.Due to extensive cross-breeding, modern roses have complex DNA sequences that are difficult to reconstruct and previous attempts to fit together rose DNA molecules have resulted in fragmented and hard-to-read assemblages.But now they have found a way to edit the genes of roses, even if such bouquets are still a few years down the line. For the new work, researchers used advanced techniques to sequence the genome of the species Old Blush (Rosa chinensis). The plant, known for its sweet scent and delicate clusters of pink flowers, is thought to be the first East Asian rose to reach Europe some time in the 18th century. A rose on display at the 2016 Hampton Court Flower showCredit:Geoff Pugh David Austin Roses Vanessa BellCredit:HOWARD RICE Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. read more